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Volume 13, Number 6—June 2007

Research

West Nile Virus Viremia in Eastern Chipmunks (Tamias striatus) Sufficient for Infecting Different Mosquitoes

Kenneth B. Platt*Comments to Author , Bradley J. Tucker*, Patrick G. Halbur*, Sonthaya Tiawsirisup†, Bradley J. Blitvich*, Flor G. Fabiosa*, Lyric C. Bartholomay*, and Wayne A. Rowley*
Author affiliations: *Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA; †Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand;

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Figure 2

Sections of chipmunk tissues 9 days after intramuscular inoculation with West Nile virus (WNV). A) Lesions were absent, but WNV antigen (brown staining) was demonstrated in scattered epithelial cells and in macrophagelike cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine. B) WNV antigen (brown staining) was demonstrated in necrotic renal tubular epithelial cells. Tissues were stained with hematoxylin, and WNV-specific mouse ascites fluid (ATCC Catalog #VR01267CAF) was used as the primary antibody for immunohistochemical staining. Scale bars = 50 μm.

Figure 2. Sections of chipmunk tissues 9 days after intramuscular inoculation with West Nile virus (WNV). A) Lesions were absent, but WNV antigen (brown staining) was demonstrated in scattered epithelial cells and in macrophagelike cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine. B) WNV antigen (brown staining) was demonstrated in necrotic renal tubular epithelial cells. Tissues were stained with hematoxylin, and WNV-specific mouse ascites fluid (ATCC Catalog #VR01267CAF) was used as the primary antibody for immunohistochemical staining. Scale bars = 50 μm.

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