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Volume 13, Number 6—June 2007

Research

Levels of Abnormal Prion Protein in Deer and Elk with Chronic Wasting Disease

Brent L. Race*, Kimberly D. Meade-White*, Anne Ward*, Jean Jewell†, Michael W. Miller‡, Elizabeth S. Williams†1, Bruce Chesebro*, and Richard E. Race*Comments to Author 

Author affiliations: *Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, Montana, USA; †University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, USA; ‡Colorado Division of Wildlife, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA;

Main Article

Figure 2

Quantification of disease-associated prion protein (PrPres) in brain, tonsil, and retropharyngeal lymph node (RPLN) from chronic wasting disease–affected elk and deer. The relative amount of PrPres in each lane of Figure 1 is shown relative to a common control described in the Figure 1 legend. A split scale is shown for elk brain because the PrPres signal from each elk brain was strong enough with 2-mg equivalents of tissue to obscure the protein patterns on the gel. Twenty-milligram equivalents were analyzed for all other tissues. The 10-fold difference in the amount of tissue equivalents loaded is accounted for by the split scale, where the result from 2-mg equivalents was multiplied by 10. Data shown are the average of 4 duplicate gels run for each sample. PrPres level in elk brain is significantly different from deer brain (p<0.001), elk tonsil is significantly different from deer tonsil (p = 0.0274), and elk RPLN is significantly different from deer RPLN (p = 0.0087) (Mann-Whitney test). C, reference control; U, uninfected elk or deer.

Figure 2. Quantification of disease-associated prion protein (PrPres) in brain, tonsil, and retropharyngeal lymph node (RPLN) from chronic wasting disease–affected elk and deer. The relative amount of PrPres in each lane of Figure 1 is shown relative to a common control described in the Figure 1 legend. A split scale is shown for elk brain because the PrPres signal from each elk brain was strong enough with 2-mg equivalents of tissue to obscure the protein patterns on the gel. Twenty-milligram equivalents were analyzed for all other tissues. The 10-fold difference in the amount of tissue equivalents loaded is accounted for by the split scale, where the result from 2-mg equivalents was multiplied by 10. Data shown are the average of 4 duplicate gels run for each sample. PrPres level in elk brain is significantly different from deer brain (p<0.001), elk tonsil is significantly different from deer tonsil (p = 0.0274), and elk RPLN is significantly different from deer RPLN (p = 0.0087) (Mann-Whitney test). C, reference control; U, uninfected elk or deer.

Main Article

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