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Volume 13, Number 9—September 2007

Research

Simian Foamy Virus Transmission from Apes to Humans, Rural Cameroon

Sara Calattini*, Edouard B.A. Betsem†, Alain Froment‡, Philippe Mauclère*†‡§, Patricia Tortevoye*, Christine Schmitt*, Richard Njouom§, Ali Saib¶, and Antoine Gessain*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Institut Pasteur, Paris, France; †Université de Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroun; ‡Centre de l'InstitutdeRecherchepourleDéveloppement, Orléans, France; §Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Yaoundé, Cameroun; ¶Hôpital Saint Louis, Paris, France;

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Figure 4

Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy results. A) Typical multinucleated giant cells with a clear seroreactivity of AG16 antigens, determined by using an immunofluorescence assay with positive anti–foamy virus serum, on BHK-21–infected cells cocultivated with stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. B) Electron microscopy of ultrathin sections from cells infected by AG16 foamy virus.

Figure 4. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy results. A) Typical multinucleated giant cells with a clear seroreactivity of AG16 antigens, determined by using an immunofluorescence assay with positive anti–foamy virus serum, on BHK-21–infected cells cocultivated with stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. B) Electron microscopy of ultrathin sections from cells infected by AG16 foamy virus.

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