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Volume 14, Number 1—January 2008

Dispatch

Magpies as Hosts for West Nile Virus, Southern France

Elsa Jourdain*†‡§Comments to Author , Michel Gauthier-Clerc*, Philippe Sabatier‡, Océane Grège*, Timothy Greenland¶, Agnès Leblond‡, Murielle Lafaye#, and Hervé G. Zeller†
Author affiliations: *Centre de Recherche de la Tour du Valat, Arles, France; †Institut Pasteur, Lyon, France; ‡Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Lyon, Marcy l’Etoile, France; §Kalmar University, Kalmar, Sweden; ¶Université Claude Bernard, Lyon, France; #French Space Agency, Toulouse, France;

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Figure

Area of Camargue, France, showing locations of magpie capture sites: site A (n = 56, with 24 adults, 32 juveniles, and 0 nestlings), site B (n = 94, with 34 adults, 57 juveniles, and 3 nestlings), site C (n = 68, with 17 adults, 34 juveniles, and 17 nestlings), and site D (n = 53, with 1 adult, 52 juveniles, and 0 nestlings). Confirmed equine and avian cases infected with West Nile virus in 2004 are also indicated. Histograms correspond to site designations and indicate serologic titers (x-axes) measured by using a microneutralization test plotted against no. birds (y-axes).

Figure. Area of Camargue, France, showing locations of magpie capture sites: site A (n = 56, with 24 adults, 32 juveniles, and 0 nestlings), site B (n = 94, with 34 adults, 57 juveniles, and 3 nestlings), site C (n = 68, with 17 adults, 34 juveniles, and 17 nestlings), and site D (n = 53, with 1 adult, 52 juveniles, and 0 nestlings). Confirmed equine and avian cases infected with West Nile virus in 2004 are also indicated. Histograms correspond to site designations and indicate serologic titers (x-axes) measured by using a microneutralization test plotted against no. birds (y-axes).

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