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Volume 14, Number 10—October 2008

Research

Risk Factors for Nipah Virus Encephalitis in Bangladesh1

Joel M. Montgomery2Comments to Author , Mohamed J. Hossain, E. Gurley, D.S. Carroll, A. Croisier, E. Bertherat, N. Asgari, P. Formenty, N. Keeler, J. Comer, M.R. Bell, K. Akram, A.R. Molla, K. Zaman, Mohamed R. Islam, K. Wagoner, J.N. Mills, P.E. Rollin, T.G. Ksiazek, and R.F. Breiman
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (J.M. Montgomery, D.S. Carroll, N. Keeler, J. Comer, M.R. Bell, K. Wagoner, J.N. Mills, P.E. Rollin, T.G. Ksiazek); International Centre for Diarrheal Diseases Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh (M.J. Hossain, E. Gurley, R.F. Breiman); World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland (A. Croisier, E. Bertherat, N. Asgari, P. Formenty); World Health Organization, Dhaka (K. Akram, K. Zaman); Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research, Dhaka (A.R. Molla, M.R. Islam);

Main Article

Figure 2

Epidemic curve of Nipah virus outbreak in Goalando, Bangladesh, in 2004, demonstrating household clustering. Households 1 and 4 each had 2 cases, household 5 had 3 cases, and all other households, single cases.

Figure 2. Epidemic curve of Nipah virus outbreak in Goalando, Bangladesh, in 2004, demonstrating household clustering. Households 1 and 4 each had 2 cases, household 5 had 3 cases, and all other households, single cases.

Main Article

1Presented in part at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2004 Nov 7–11, Miami, Florida, USA.

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