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Volume 14, Number 12—December 2008

Research

African Swine Fever Virus Isolate, Georgia, 2007

Rebecca J. Rowlands, Vincent Michaud, Livio Heath, Geoff Hutchings, Chris Oura, Wilna Vosloo, Rahana Dwarka, Tinatin Onashvili, Emmanuel Albina, and Linda K. DixonComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Institute for Animal Health, Pirbright, UK (R.J. Rowlands, G. Hutchings, C. Oura, L.K. Dixon); Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement, Montpellier, France (V. Michaud, E. Albina); Agricultural Research Council–Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Onderstepoort, South Africa (L. Heath, W. Vosloo, R. Dwarka); University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa (W. Vosloo); Laboratory of Ministry of Agriculture of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia (T. Onashvili)

Main Article

Figure

Phylogram depicting the B646L gene relationships of selected isolates representative of the 22 African swine fever virus genotypes. Because all the Georgian isolates had identical nucleotide sequences, only 1 isolate is presented in the tree (in boldface). The consensus tree was generated from 1,000 replicates; only bootstraps >50% are shown. Genotypes are indicated in roman numerals. Moz, Mozambique. Scale bar indicates number of nucleotide substitutions per site.

Figure. Phylogram depicting the B646L gene relationships of selected isolates representative of the 22 African swine fever virus genotypes. Because all the Georgian isolates had identical nucleotide sequences, only 1 isolate is presented in the tree (in boldface). The consensus tree was generated from 1,000 replicates; only bootstraps >50% are shown. Genotypes are indicated in roman numerals. Moz, Mozambique. Scale bar indicates number of nucleotide substitutions per site.

Main Article

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