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Volume 14, Number 12—December 2008

Dispatch

Possible Emergence of West Caucasian Bat Virus in Africa

Ivan V. KuzminComments to Author , Michael Niezgoda, Richard Franka, Bernard Agwanda, Wanda Markotter, Janet C. Beagley, Olga Yu Urazova, Robert F. Breiman, and Charles E. Rupprecht
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (I.V. Kuzmin, M. Niezgoda, R. Franka, O.Y. Urazova, C.E. Rupprecht); National Museum of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya (B. Agwanda); University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa (W. Markotter); University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA (J.C. Beagley); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Kenya, Nairobi (R.F. Breiman)

Main Article

Figure 1

A) Map of Kenya showing locations of the bat collections, numbered in order of collection. B). Antibody titers to West Caucasian bat virus (WCBV) in Miniopterus bats from 4 of the locations. A modified rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test for WCBV-neutralizing antibodies was used. Bats with 50% end-point neutralizing titers >1 log10 were considered seropositive. Numbers of negative bats for each location are circled below the cutoff line.

Figure 1. A) Map of Kenya showing locations of the bat collections, numbered in order of collection. B). Antibody titers to West Caucasian bat virus (WCBV) in Miniopterus bats from 4 of the locations. A modified rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test for WCBV-neutralizing antibodies was used. Bats with 50% end-point neutralizing titers >1 log10 were considered seropositive. Numbers of negative bats for each location are circled below the cutoff line.

Main Article

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