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Volume 14, Number 2—February 2008

Dispatch

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Geneva, Switzerland, 1993–2005

Patrice Francois*1Comments to Author , Stephan Harbarth*1, Antoine Huyghe*, Gesuele Renzi*, Manuela Bento*, Alain Gervaix*, Didier Pittet*, and Jacques Schrenzel*
Author affiliations: *University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland;

Main Article

Figure

Incidence of non–multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, Geneva, Switzerland, 1993–2005. A) Number of strains collected since 1993 showing an atypical multidrug-susceptible phenotype (white bars). Also shown are the number of SCCmec IV and V (circles) isolates and number of strains containing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) (triangles). B) Evolution of the 3 most abundant clonotypes (ST80, ST88, and ST5). Despite a constant number of strains isolated since 2002, the proportion of these clones has decreased, which suggests increasing diversity of clones in our population of community acquired–MRSA.

Figure. Incidence of non–multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, Geneva, Switzerland, 1993–2005. A) Number of strains collected since 1993 showing an atypical multidrug-susceptible phenotype (white bars). Also shown are the number of SCCmec IV and V (circles) isolates and number of strains containing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) (triangles). B) Evolution of the 3 most abundant clonotypes (ST80, ST88, and ST5). Despite a constant number of strains isolated since 2002, the proportion of these clones has decreased, which suggests increasing diversity of clones in our population of community acquired–MRSA.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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