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Volume 14, Number 4—April 2008

Dispatch

Mycobacterium avium Lymphadenopathy among Children, Sweden

Johanna Thegerström*†Comments to Author , Victoria Romanus‡, Vanda Friman§, Lars Brudin*, Paul D. Haemig¶, and Björn Olsen¶#
Author affiliations: *Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden; †Linköping Medical University, Linköping, Sweden; ‡Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden; §Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden; ¶Kalmar University, Kalmar, Sweden; #Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

Main Article

Figure 1

Seasonal incidence of Mycobacterium avium infection in Swedish children (1983–2003) in our study (bars = real numbers) and as predicted by nonlinear regression sine functions (equations: y = a + bsin[(x – c)Π/6], where x represents the months (1–12) (www.smhi.se), and with “a,” “b,” and “c” characteristic for each curve and b ≠ 0 with statistical significance, p<0.05, for all these curves. (See also online Appendix Table, available from www.cdc.gov/EID/content/14/4/661-appT.htm) A) All children. The curves were statistically significant, p<0.05, for both 1983–1997 and 1998–2003, and so the data for all years were grouped together. UCL, upper confidence limit; LCL, lower confidence limit.  B) Children <2 years and >2 years of age, respectively. “b,” amplitude of curve, has a tendency to be greater for children <2 years of age (p = 0.07) and “c” is slightly smaller for children >2 years of age, representing a shift to the right of the curve, though not statistically significant. Pred, predicted.

Figure 1. Seasonal incidence of Mycobacterium avium infection in Swedish children (1983–2003) in our study (bars = real numbers) and as predicted by nonlinear regression sine functions (equations: y = a + bsin[(x – c)Π/6], where x represents the months (112) (www.smhi.se), and with “a,” “b,” and “c” characteristic for each curve and b ≠ 0 with statistical significance, p<0.05, for all these curves. (See also online Appendix Table, available from www.cdc.gov/EID/content/14/4/661-appT.htm) A) All children. The curves were statistically significant, p<0.05, for both 1983–1997 and 1998–2003, and so the data for all years were grouped together. UCL, upper confidence limit; LCL, lower confidence limit. B) Children <2 years and >2 years of age, respectively. “b,” amplitude of curve, has a tendency to be greater for children <2 years of age (p = 0.07) and “c” is slightly smaller for children >2 years of age, representing a shift to the right of the curve, though not statistically significant. Pred, predicted.

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