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Volume 14, Number 4—April 2008

Dispatch

Rabies Virus in Raccoons, Ohio, 2004

J. Caroline Henderson*1, Roman Biek*2, Cathleen A. Hanlon†, Scott O'Dee‡, and Leslie A. Real*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, USA; ‡Ohio Department of Health, Reynoldsburg, Ohio, USA;

Main Article

Appendix Figure

Maximum-likelihood tree of 67 partial G gene sequences of raccoon rabies virus sampled in or near Ohio, 1987–2004. Sequences from the 2004 outbreak are shown in boldface. Bootstrap values and corresponding Bayesian posterior values (both as percentages) are shown for key nodes. Tree was rooted using a raccoon rabies virus sequence from a Florida raccoon (not shown). Numbers following taxa names indicate the time of sampling, which is expressed relative to the year 1900 (i.e., '102.6' represents June 10 of the year 2002). See Figure 2 for further details.

Appendix Figure. Maximum-likelihood tree of 67 partial G gene sequences of raccoon rabies virus sampled in or near Ohio, 1987–2004. Sequences from the 2004 outbreak are shown in boldface. Bootstrap values and corresponding Bayesian posterior values (both as percentages) are shown for key nodes. Tree was rooted using a raccoon rabies virus sequence from a Florida raccoon (not shown). Numbers following taxa names indicate the time of sampling, which is expressed relative to the year 1900 (i.e., '102.6' represents June 10 of the year 2002). See Figure 2 for further details.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

2Current affiliation: University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

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