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Volume 14, Number 4—April 2008

Research

Emericella quadrilineata as Cause of Invasive Aspergillosis

Paul E. Verweij*Comments to Author , János Varga†‡, Jos Houbraken†, Antonius J.M.M. Rijs*, Frans M. VerduynLunel*, Nicole M.A. Blijlevens*, Yvonne R. Shea§, Steven M. Holland§, Adilia Warris*, Willem J. G. Melchers*, and Robert A. Samson†
Author affiliations: *Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; †Centraal Bureau voor Schimmelcultures Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands,; ‡University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; §National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA;

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Figure 2

Neighbor-joining tree based on calmodulin sequence data of Emericella isolates examined. Clinical isolates are set in boldface. Numbers above branches are bootstrap values. Only values >70% are indicated. T indicates the type strain; * indicates the isolates that had been misidentified by morphologic identification as E. nidulans. Scale bar represents genetic distance calculated by the Kimura 2-parameter model (18).

Figure 2. Neighbor-joining tree based on calmodulin sequence data of Emericella isolates examined. Clinical isolates are set in boldface. Numbers above branches are bootstrap values. Only values >70% are indicated. T indicates the type strain; * indicates the isolates that had been misidentified by morphologic identification as E. nidulans. Scale bar represents genetic distance calculated by the Kimura 2-parameter model (18).

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