Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 14, Number 6—June 2008

Research

Validation of Syndromic Surveillance for Respiratory Pathogen Activity

Cees van den Wijngaard*Comments to Author , Liselotte van Asten*, Wilfrid van Pelt*, Nico J.D. Nagelkerke†, Robert Verheij‡, Albert J. de Neeling*, Arnold Dekkers*, Marianne A.B. van der Sande*, Hans van Vliet*, and Marion P.G. Koopmans*
Author affiliations: *National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands; †United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates; ‡Netherlands Institute of Health Services Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands;

Main Article

Figure 1

Respiratory syndrome time series and laboratory pathogen counts in the Netherlands. Respiratory syndromes were defined for the 6 registries defined in Table 1: A) absenteeism, B) general practice (GP) consultations, C) pharmacy, D) laboratory submissions, E) hospitalizations, and F) mortality counts. Pathogens plotted were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A, influenza B, and Streptococcus pneumoniae [1999–2004 or part of this period, panels A–C]. Recurrent unexplained syndrome elevations in October are circled. Pathogen counts are daily counts of pathogens found in laboratory survellience.

Figure 1. Respiratory syndrome time series and laboratory pathogen counts in the Netherlands. Respiratory syndromes were defined for the 6 registries defined in Table 1: A) absenteeism, B) general practice (GP) consultations, C) pharmacy, D) laboratory submissions, E) hospitalizations, and F) mortality counts. Pathogens plotted were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A, influenza B, and Streptococcus pneumoniae [1999–2004 or part of this period, panels A–C]. Recurrent unexplained syndrome elevations in October are circled. Pathogen counts are daily counts of pathogens found in laboratory survellience.

Main Article

TOP