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Volume 14, Number 7—July 2008

Research

Toxinotype V Clostridium difficile in Humans and Food Animals

Michael A. Jhung*Comments to Author , Angela D. Thompson*, George E. Killgore*, Walter E. Zukowski†, Glenn Songer‡, Michael Warny§, Stuart Johnson†¶, Dale N. Gerding†¶, L. Clifford McDonald*, and Brandi M. Limbago*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Hines Veterans Affairs Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA; ‡University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA; §Acambis, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; ¶Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago;

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Figure 1

A). Dendrogram analysis of toxinotype V Clostridium difficile human and animal isolates using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE); SmaI restriction digest. Three animal-human isolate groups had indistinguishable PFGE patterns (2 NAP7 and 1 NAP8 group). Three of the NAP8 isolates (2005071, 2005093, 2005524) had identical REA types (BK6) as well. *PCR type unavailable. B) Dendrogram analysis using PFGE; EagI restriction digest. One human–pig pair (2005071 and 2005514) had identical PFGE patter

Figure 1. A). Dendrogram analysis of toxinotype V Clostridium difficile human and animal isolates using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE); SmaI restriction digest. Three animal-human isolate groups had indistinguishable PFGE patterns (2 NAP7 and 1 NAP8 group). Three of the NAP8 isolates (2005071, 2005093, 2005524) had identical REA types (BK6) as well. *PCR type unavailable. B) Dendrogram analysis using PFGE; EagI restriction digest. One human–pig pair (2005071 and 2005514) had identical PFGE patterns by both EagI and SmaI as well as identical REA patterns (BK6). Digestion of bovine isolates with EagI yielded results that were not interpretable and were not included in this figure.

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