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Volume 15, Number 1—January 2009

Dispatch

Isolation of Candidatus Bartonella melophagi from Human Blood1

Ricardo G. Maggi, Michael Kosoy, Melanie Mintzer, and Edward B. BreitschwerdtComments to Author 
Author affiliations: North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA (R.G. Maggi and E.B. Breitschwerdt); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (M. Kosoy); Generations Family Practice, Cary, North Carolina, USA (M. Mintzer)

Main Article

Figure

Transmission electron micrographs of Candidatus Bartonella melophagi–like isolate 05-HO-1 from a human (A) (image provided by the North Carolina State University–College of Veterinary Medicine Electron Microscopy Facility, Raleigh, NC, USA) and Candidatus B. melophagi isolate from a sheep ked (B) (image provided by V. Popov, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA). Magnification ×41,000 in A and ×62,700 in B.

Figure. Transmission electron micrographs of Candidatus Bartonella melophagi–like isolate 05-HO-1 from a human (A) (image provided by the North Carolina State University–College of Veterinary Medicine Electron Microscopy Facility, Raleigh, NC, USA) and Candidatus B. melophagi isolate from a sheep ked (B) (image provided by V. Popov, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA). Magnification ×41,000 in A and ×62,700 in B.

Main Article

1Results of this study were presented in part at the 21st Meeting of the American Society for Rickettsiology, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA, September 8–11, 2007.

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