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Volume 15, Number 11—November 2009

Dispatch

Mayaro Fever Virus, Brazilian Amazon

Raimunda S.S. Azevedo, Eliana V.P. Silva, Valéria L. Carvalho, Sueli G. Rodrigues, Joaquim P. Nunes Neto, Hamilton A.O. Monteiro, Victor S. Peixoto, Jannifer O. Chiang, Márcio R.T. Nunes, and Pedro F.C. VasconcelosComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Instituto Evandro Chagas, Ananindeua, Brazil (R.S.S. Azevedo, E.V.P. Silva, V.L. Carvalho, S.G. Rodrigues, J.P. Nunes Neto, H.A.O. Monteiro, J.O. Chiang, M.R.T. Nunes, P.F.C. Vasconcelos); Universidade do Estado do Pará, Belém, Brazil (V.S. Peixoto, P.F.C. Vasconcelos)

Main Article

Figure 2

Comparison of genetic relationships among the Marayo virus strains sequenced in this study with those isolated in different areas of South America, periods of time, and hosts. Numbers above and within parentheses correspond to bootstrap support values for the specific clades. The Una virus was used as an outgroup to root the tree. BR, Brazil (BEL, Belém; SB, Santa Barbara [bold]; TO, Tocantins state); BOL, Bolivia; PE, Peru; SUR, Suriname; H, human; Ar, arthropod. Numbers in parentheses correspo

Figure 2. Comparison of genetic relationships among the Marayo virus strains sequenced in this study with those isolated in different areas of South America, periods of time, and hosts. Numbers above and within parentheses correspond to bootstrap support values for the specific clades. The Una virus was used as an outgroup to root the tree. BR, Brazil (BEL, Belém; SB, Santa Barbara [bold]; TO, Tocantins state); BOL, Bolivia; PE, Peru; SUR, Suriname; H, human; Ar, arthropod. Numbers in parentheses correspond to the year of isolation of each strain. Items in boldface indicate strains isolated in this study.

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