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Volume 15, Number 11—November 2009

Research

Imported Infectious Diseases in Mobile Populations, Spain

Begoña Monge-Maillo, B. Carolina Jiménez, José A. Pérez-Molina, Francesca F. Norman, Miriam Navarro, Ana Pérez-Ayala, Juan M. Herrero, Pilar Zamarrón, and Rogelio López-VélezComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain

Main Article

Table 2

Immigrants’ reasons for seeking medical assistance, by area of origin, Tropical Medicine Unit, Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain, 1989–2008*

Syndrome Total population, no. (%), 
N = 2,198 Sub-Saharan Africans, no. (%), n = 1,564 Latin Americans, no. (%),
n = 634 p value
Hematologic–eosinophilia 570 (26) 435 (28) 135 (21.3) 0.002
Dermatologic 544 (24.7) 477 (30.5) 67 (10.6) 0.001
Fever 451 (20.5) 351 (22.4) 100 (15.8) 0.001
Asymptomatic 396 (18) 268 (17.1) 128 (20.2) 0.09
Gastrointestinal 363 (16.5) 269 (17.2) 94 (14.8) 0.608
Respiratory 314 (14.3) 209 (13.4) 105 (16.6) 0.006
Hematologic–anemia 283 (12.9) 230 (14.7) 53 (8.4) 0.001
Genitourinary 234 (10.6) 198 (12.7) 36 (5.7) 0.001
Neurologic 219 (10) 144 (9.2) 75 (11.8) 0.03
Musculoskeletal 169 (7.7) 141 (9) 28 (4.4) 0.001

*Because each patient could have >1 main reason for seeking medical assistance, the number of cases can be higher than the number of patients. Percentages were calculated as number of cases divided by number of patients in each group (total population, sub-Sahara African immigrants, or Latin American immigrants).

Main Article

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