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Volume 15, Number 11—November 2009

Research

Screening Practices for Infectious Diseases among Burmese Refugees in Australia

Nadia J. Chaves1, Katherine B. Gibney1, Karin Leder, Daniel P. O’Brien, Caroline Marshall, and Beverley-Ann BiggsComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (N.J. Chaves, K.B. Gibney, K. Leder, D.P. O’Brien, C. Marshall, B.-A. Biggs); Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (K. Leder); Médecins sans Frontières Holland, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (D.P. O’Brien); University of Melbourne, Parkville (C. Marshall, B.-A. Biggs); 1These authors contributed equally to this article.

Main Article

Figure

Proportion of 156 recently arrived Burmese refugees with documented screening tests for common health conditions, Australia, 2004–2008. Most of these tests are recommended by the Australasian Infectious Diseases Society guidelines (5). Tests for vitamin D levels are beyond the scope of these guidelines. Black, tested; red, not tested.

Figure. Proportion of 156 recently arrived Burmese refugees with documented screening tests for common health conditions, Australia, 2004–2008. Most of these tests are recommended by the Australasian Infectious Diseases Society guidelines (5). Tests for vitamin D levels are beyond the scope of these guidelines. Black, tested; red, not tested.

Main Article

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