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Volume 15, Number 11—November 2009

Research

Screening Practices for Infectious Diseases among Burmese Refugees in Australia

Nadia J. Chaves1, Katherine B. Gibney1, Karin Leder, Daniel P. O’Brien, Caroline Marshall, and Beverley-Ann BiggsComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (N.J. Chaves, K.B. Gibney, K. Leder, D.P. O’Brien, C. Marshall, B.-A. Biggs); Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (K. Leder); Médecins sans Frontières Holland, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (D.P. O’Brien); University of Melbourne, Parkville (C. Marshall, B.-A. Biggs); 1These authors contributed equally to this article.

Main Article

Table 1

Patient characteristics, Burmese refugees in Australia, 2004–2008*

Characteristic Value
Age group, y, no. (%)
<25 36 (23.1)
25–49 108 (69.2)
>50
12 (7.7)
Gender, no. (%)
M 80 (51.3)
F
76 (48.7)
Country of birth, no. (%)
Burma (Myanmar) 152 (97.4)
Thailand
4 (2.6)
Preferred language, no. (%), n = 155
Burmese 23 (14.8)
Karen 74 (47.7)
Chin 55 (35.5)
English 2 (1.3)
Zotung
1 (0.6)
Transit through refugee camp, no. (%), n = 137
133 (97.1)
Country of refugee camp, no. (%), n = 135

Thailand/Thailand-Burma border 71 (52.6)
Malaysia 55 (40.7)
Other
9 (6.7)
Referral by general practitioner, no. (%)
151 (96.8)
No. clinic visits per refugee, median (range) 5 (1–18)
No. months attended clinic, median (range) 8 (1–23)
No. months in Australia, median (range) 4 (<1–60)

*n = 156 unless otherwise specified.

Main Article

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