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Volume 15, Number 11—November 2009

Dispatch

Dirofilaria repens Infection and Concomitant Meningoencephalitis

Sven PoppertComments to Author , Maike Hodapp, Andreas Krueger, Guido Hegasy, Wolf-Dirk Niesen, Winfried V. Kern, and Egbert Tannich
Author affiliations: Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany (S. Poppert, A. Krueger, G. Hegasy, E. Tannich); Albert-Ludwig-University, Freiburg, Germany (M. Hodapp, W.-D. Niesen, W.V. Kern)

Main Article

Figure

Images of the adult female Dirofilaria repens worm removed from a subcutanous nodule of the patient. A) Macroscopic view of sections of the worm in saline in a petri dish. Two uteri and the intestinal tract can be seen protruding from a disrupted end of the largest section. The saline is turbid due to the massive release of microfilariae, which are not discernible at this magnification. Scale bar = 1 cm. B) Microscopic view of the outer cuticula with multiple longitudinal ridges. Scale bar = 100

Figure. Images of the adult female Dirofilaria repens worm removed from a subcutanous nodule of the patient. A) Macroscopic view of sections of the worm in saline in a petri dish. Two uteri and the intestinal tract can be seen protruding from a disrupted end of the largest section. The saline is turbid due to the massive release of microfilariae, which are not discernible at this magnification. Scale bar = 1 cm. B) Microscopic view of the outer cuticula with multiple longitudinal ridges. Scale bar = 100 μm. C) Microscopic view of the worm showing the well-developed muscle layer and the uterus containing microfilariae. Scale bar = 100 μm. D) Higher magnification of a section of the uterus containing multiple microfilariae. Scale bar = 50 µm.

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