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Volume 15, Number 12—December 2009

Research

Landscape Epidemiology of Tularemia Outbreaks in Sweden

Kerstin Svensson, Erik Bäck, Henrik Eliasson, Lennart Berglund, Malin Granberg, Linda Karlsson, Pär Larsson, Mats Forsman, and Anders JohanssonComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Swedish Defense Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden (K. Svensson, M. Granberg, L. Karlsson, P. Larsson, M. Forsman, A. Johansson); Umeå University, Umeå (K. Svensson, A. Johansson); Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden (E. Bäck, H. Eliasson); Ljusdal Healthcare Centre, Ljusdal, Sweden (L. Berglund); Umeå University Hospital, Umeå (A. Johansson)

Main Article

Figure 4

A) Cluster site for tularemia transmission at Oset/Rynningeviken nature reserve in Örebro, Sweden, with 83 patient reports. Twenty-seven Francisella tularensis isolates were recovered from these patients. B) Cluster site for tularemia transmission at Lake Lången, Örebro, Sweden, with 17 patient reports. Nine F. tularensis isolates were recovered from these patients. Place of disease transmission were reported to be certain (circle), probable (square), or possible (diamond); patient residency (tr

Figure 4. A) Cluster site for tularemia transmission at Oset/Rynningeviken nature reserve in Örebro, Sweden, with 83 patient reports. Twenty-seven Francisella tularensis isolates were recovered from these patients. B) Cluster site for tularemia transmission at Lake Lången, Örebro, Sweden, with 17 patient reports. Nine F. tularensis isolates were recovered from these patients. Place of disease transmission were reported to be certain (circle), probable (square), or possible (diamond); patient residency (triangle) was used if no such data was available. Genetic groups are indicated by color: yellow (1a), green (1b), blue (1d), or purple (2); white indicates no F. tularensis culture.

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