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Volume 15, Number 12—December 2009

Dispatch

Aleutian Mink Disease Virus and Humans

Jørgen R. JepsenComments to Author , Francesco d’Amore, Ulrik Baandrup, Michael Roost Clausen, Elisabeth Gottschalck, and Bent Aasted
Author affiliations: Hospital of South-Western Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark (J.R. Jepsen); Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark (F. d’Amore, M.R. Clausen); Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark (U. Baandrup); Gl. Ringstedvej 63 D, Holbæk, Denmark (E. Gottschalck); University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (B. Aasted)

Main Article

Figure 2

Histopathologic appearance of renal biopsy sample from 54-year-old mink farmer in Denmark who had been exposed to Aleutian mink disease parvovirus−infected mink for 34 years (patient 2). A) Glomeruli with hypercellularity and crescents. Original magnification ×20. B) Electron microscopy showing distinct extracellular deposits of coarse 20-nm fibrils (microtubular structures) characterized as immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Original magnification ×100,000.

Figure 2. Histopathologic appearance of renal biopsy sample from 54-year-old mink farmer in Denmark who had been exposed to Aleutian mink disease parvovirus−infected mink for 34 years (patient 2). A) Glomeruli with hypercellularity and crescents. Original magnification ×20. B) Electron microscopy showing distinct extracellular deposits of coarse 20-nm fibrils (microtubular structures) characterized as immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Original magnification ×100,000.

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