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Volume 15, Number 2—February 2009

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Enteroviruses in Patients with Acute Encephalitis, Uttar Pradesh, India

Gajanan N. Sapkal, Vijay P. Bondre, Pradip V. Fulmali, Pooja Patil, Vipul Dadhania, Vijay M. Ayachit, Daya Gangale, K.P. Kushwaha, A.K. Rathi, Shobha D. Chitambar, Akhilesh Chandra Mishra, Milind M. GoreComments to Author , and Gopalkrishna
Author affiliations: National Institute of Virology, Pune, India (G.N. Sapkal, V.P. Bondre, P.V. Fulmali, P. Patil, V. Gopalkrishna, V. Dadhania, V.M. Ayachit, D. Gangale, S.D. Chitambar, A.C. Mishra, M.M. Gore); Baba Raghav Das Medical College, Gorakhpur, India (K.P Kushwaha, A.K. Rathi)

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Figure 2

Phylogenetic tree based on partial virion protein 1 (VP1) sequences (2602–2977) detected in enterovirus (EV) isolates and clinical specimens from encephalitis patients. GenBank accession nos. indicate the nucleotide sequences of EV strains of the present study. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. EV, enterovirus; CV-A, coxsackie virus A; CV-B, coxsackie virus B; HEV, human enterovirus; NIV, National Institute of Virology, Pune, India.

Figure 2. Phylogenetic tree based on partial virion protein 1 (VP1) sequences (2602–2977) detected in enterovirus (EV) isolates and clinical specimens from encephalitis patients. GenBank accession nos. indicate the nucleotide sequences of EV strains of the present study. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. EV, enterovirus; CV-A, coxsackie virus A; CV-B, coxsackie virus B; HEV, human enterovirus; NIV, National Institute of Virology, Pune, India.

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