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Volume 15, Number 2—February 2009

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Chikungunya Virus and Central Nervous System Infections in Children, India

Penny LewthwaiteComments to Author , Ravi Vasanthapuram, Jane C. Osborne, Ashia Begum, Jenna L.M. Plank, M. Veera Shankar, Roger Hewson, Anita Desai, Nick J. Beeching, Ravi Ravikumar, and Tom Solomon
Author affiliations: University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK (P. Lewthwaite, T. Solomon); National Institute of Mental Health and Neurological Sciences, Bangalore, India (R. Vasanthapuram, A. Desai); Health Protection Agency, Salisbury, UK (J.C. Osborne, J.L.M. Plank, R. Hewson); Vijayanagar Institute of Medical Sciences Bellay, Karnataka, India (A. Begum, M. Veera Shankar, R. Ravikumar); Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (N.J. Beeching).

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Figure 1

Digital gangrene in an 8-month-old girl during week 3 of hospitalization. She was admitted to the hospital with fever, multiple seizures, and a widespread rash; chikungunya virus was detected in her plasma. A) Little finger of the left hand; B) index finger of the right hand; and C) 4 toes on the right foot.

Figure 1. Digital gangrene in an 8-month-old girl during week 3 of hospitalization. She was admitted to the hospital with fever, multiple seizures, and a widespread rash; chikungunya virus was detected in her plasma. A) Little finger of the left hand; B) index finger of the right hand; and C) 4 toes on the right foot.

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