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Volume 15, Number 2—February 2009

Research

Severe Dengue Epidemics in Sri Lanka, 2003–2006

Nalaka Kanakaratne, Wahala M.P.B. Wahala, William B. Messer, Hasitha A. Tissera, Aruna Shahani, Nihal Abeysinghe, Aravinda M. de Silva, and Maya Gunasekera1
Author affiliations: Genetech Research Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka (N. Kanakaratne, M. Gunasekera); University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA (W.M.P.B. Wahala, W.B. Messer, A.M de Silva); Ministry of Health, Colombo (H.A. Tissera, N. Abeysinghe); Apollo Hospital, Colombo (A. Shahani)

Main Article

Figure 7

Phylogram of dengue serotype 4 viruses (DENV-4) from Sri Lanka (SL), 1978–2004, and other DENV-4 viruses. The tree is based on a 296-bp for positions 787–1083 coding for portions of premembrane and envelope proteins. The tree was constructed as described in Figure 4 and rooted by using a sylvatic DENV-4 strain. Classification and naming of different DENV-4 genotypes is based on the report by Rico-Hesse (5). Scale bar represents number of base substitutions per site.

Figure 7. Phylogram of dengue serotype 4 viruses (DENV-4) from Sri Lanka (SL), 1978–2004, and other DENV-4 viruses. The tree is based on a 296-bp for positions 787–1083 coding for portions of premembrane and envelope proteins. The tree was constructed as described in Figure 4 and rooted by using a sylvatic DENV-4 strain. Classification and naming of different DENV-4 genotypes is based on the report by Rico-Hesse (5). Scale bar represents number of base substitutions per site.

Main Article

1Deceased.

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