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Volume 15, Number 4—April 2009

Dispatch

Lobomycosis in Offshore Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), North Carolina

David S. RotsteinComments to Author , Leslie G. Burdett, William McLellan, Lori Schwacke, Teri Rowles, Karen A. Terio, Stacy Schultz, and Ann Pabst
Author affiliations: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Springs, Maryland, USA (D.S. Rotstein, T. Rowles); University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA (D.S. Rotstein); Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA (L.G. Burdett); University of North Carolina, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA (W. McLellan, A. Pabst); National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Charleston (L. Schwacke); University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, USA (K.A. Terio, S. Schultz)

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Figure 2

Free-swimming bottlenose dolphin (offshore ecotype) sighted off the Outer Banks of North Carolina with raised gray to white nodules over the dorsal surface, consistent with those of lobomycosis seen in other Atlantic bottlenose dolphins. Xenobalanus sp., a barnacle, is adhered to the tip of the dorsal fin. Image provided by Ari Friedlander, Duke University Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, NC, USA.

Figure 2. Free-swimming bottlenose dolphin (offshore ecotype) sighted off the Outer Banks of North Carolina with raised gray to white nodules over the dorsal surface, consistent with those of lobomycosis seen in other Atlantic bottlenose dolphins. Xenobalanus sp., a barnacle, is adhered to the tip of the dorsal fin. Image provided by Ari Friedlander, Duke University Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, NC, USA.

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