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Volume 15, Number 6—June 2009

Synopsis

Diphyllobothriasis Associated with Eating Raw Pacific Salmon

Naoki ArizonoComments to Author , Minoru Yamada, Fukumi Nakamura-Uchiyama, and Kenji Ohnishi
Author affiliations: Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan (N. Arizono, M. Yamada); Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital, Tokyo, Japan (F. Nakamura-Uhciyama, K. Ohnishi)

Main Article

Figure 1

Wood print depicting a man passing a strobila of a broad tapeworm. The caption (not shown) said, “The man ate masu salmon. After a time, a strange object emerged from the anus and was pulled out: it turned out to be 2–3 m long.” From Shinsen Yamaino Soushi, by Daizennosuke Koan (1850). Courtesy of the Tohoku University Medical Library.

Figure 1. Wood print depicting a man passing a strobila of a broad tapeworm. The caption (not shown) said, “The man ate masu salmon. After a time, a strange object emerged from the anus and was pulled out: it turned out to be 2–3 m long.” From Shinsen Yamaino Soushi, by Daizennosuke Koan (1850). Courtesy of the Tohoku University Medical Library.

Main Article

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