Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 15, Number 7—July 2009

Dispatch

Eczema Herpeticum and Clinical Criteria for Investigating Smallpox

David A. BoydComments to Author , Leonard C. Sperling, and Scott A. Norton
Author affiliations: Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida, USA (D.A. Boyd); Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland, USA (L.C. Sperling, S.A. Norton)

Main Article

Figure 1

Clinical photographs of the patient. A) Patient with generalized pustules, which were deep seated, monomorphic, dome shaped, and firm and were distributed densely on forearms and abdomen. B) Umbilicated papulopustules. C) Umbilicated papulopustules in the same stage of evolution; no herpetiform clusters or red areolae are seen around the lesions.

Figure 1. Clinical photographs of the patient. A) Patient with generalized pustules, which were deep seated, monomorphic, dome shaped, and firm and were distributed densely on forearms and abdomen. B) Umbilicated papulopustules. C) Umbilicated papulopustules in the same stage of evolution; no herpetiform clusters or red areolae are seen around the lesions.

Main Article

TOP