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Volume 15, Number 8—August 2009

Synopsis

Spread of Cryptococcus gattii into Pacific Northwest Region of the United States

Kausik Datta, Karen H. Bartlett, Rebecca Baer, Edmond Byrnes, Eleni Galanis, Joseph Heitman, Linda Hoang, Mira J. Leslie, Laura MacDougall, Shelley S. Magill, Muhammad G. Morshed, Kieren A. MarrComments to Author , and for the Cryptococcus gattii Working Group of the Pacific Northwest1
Author affiliations: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA (K. Datta, K.A. Marr); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (K.H. Bartlett); Washington State Department of Health, Shoreline, Washington, USA (R. Baer); Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA (E. Byrnes, J. Heitman); British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver (E. Galanis, L. Hoang, L. MacDougall, M.G. Morshed); British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture and Lands, Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada (M.J. Leslie); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (S.S. Magill)

Main Article

Figure

Map of the Pacific Northwest, comprising parts of British Columbia, Canada, and the states of Washington and Oregon in the United States, showing human and veterinary Cryptococcus gattii cases (including marine mammals) by place of residence or detection, and locations of environmental isolation of C. gattii during 1999–2008 (strain NIH444 [Seattle] or CBS7750 [San Francisco] not included). Data were collected from various state health departments and published reports referenced in the text. Th

Figure. Map of the Pacific Northwest, comprising parts of British Columbia, Canada, and the states of Washington and Oregon in the United States, showing human and veterinary Cryptococcus gattii cases (including marine mammals) by place of residence or detection, and locations of environmental isolation of C. gattii during 1999–2008 (strain NIH444 [Seattle] or CBS7750 [San Francisco] not included). Data were collected from various state health departments and published reports referenced in the text. The map and icons have been used at a scale that shows gross geographic areas, effectively masking any personally identifiable patient locality information. Use of the map is courtesy of exclusive permission from Google Maps: ©2008 Google, map data ©2008 NAVTEQ.

Main Article

1The Cryptococcus gattii Working Group of the Pacific Northwest includes the authors of this report and the following members: Jim Kronstad and Theodore Steiner, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Sarah West, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Emilio DeBess, Oregon State Department of Human Services, Salem, OR, USA; Tom Chiller, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; Craig Stephen, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Ron Wohrle, Washington State Department of Health, Olympia, WA, USA; Peter Phillips, St. Paul’s Hospital, University of British Columbia; Thomas G. Mitchell, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; Robert Bildfell, Beth Valentine, and Peggy Dearing, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; Rob Barnes, Peace Health Medical Group, Eugene, OR, USA; Ajit Limaye, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Richard Ferguson, Claire Beiser, and Sara Mostad, St. Joseph Hospital, Bellingham, WA, USA; Sarah Kidd, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Greg Stern, Whatcom County Health Department, Bellingham; and Sunny Mak, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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