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Volume 15, Number 9—September 2009

Dispatch

Rickettsia parkeri in Amblyomma americanum Ticks, Tennessee and Georgia, USA

Sara B. Cohen, Michael J. Yabsley, Laurel E. Garrison, James D. Freye, Brett G. Dunlap, John R. Dunn, Daniel G. Mead, Timothy F. Jones, and Abelardo C. MoncayoComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville, Tennessee, USA (S.B. Cohen, J.R. Dunn, T.F. Jones, A.C. Moncayo); University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA (M.J. Yabsley, D.G. Mead); Georgia Department of Community Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (L.E. Garrison); United States Department of Agriculture, Madison, Tennessee, USA (J.D. Freye, B.G. Dunlap)

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Figure

Location of ticks, Rickettsia parkeri in ticks, and human cases of rickettsiosis in the United States. Green shading indicates approximate distribution of Amblyomma americanum ticks, which completely overlaps with the known or suspected distribution of A. maculatum. Yellow circles indicate locations where R. parkeri was detected in A. americanum ticks (this study). Red circles indicate locations of confirmed or suspected cases of R. parkeri infection in humans (11).

Figure. Location of ticks, Rickettsia parkeri in ticks, and human cases of rickettsiosis in the United States. Green shading indicates approximate distribution of Amblyomma americanum ticks, which completely overlaps with the known or suspected distribution of A. maculatum. Yellow circles indicate locations where R. parkeri was detected in A. americanum ticks (this study). Red circles indicate locations of confirmed or suspected cases of R. parkeri infection in humans (11).

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