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Volume 16, Number 1—January 2010

Research

Healthcare-associated Viral Gastroenteritis among Children in a Large Pediatric Hospital, United Kingdom

Nigel A. CunliffeComments to Author , J. Angela Booth, Claire Elliot, Sharon J. Lowe, Will Sopwith, Nick Kitchin, Osamu Nakagomi, Toyoko Nakagomi, C. Anthony Hart1, and Martyn Regan
Author affiliations: University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK (N.A. Cunliffe, J.A. Booth, O. Nakagomi, T. Nakagomi, C.A. Hart); Royal Liverpool Children’s National Health Service Foundation Trust, Liverpool (N.A. Cunliffe, C. Elliot, S.J. Lowe, C.A. Hart); Health Protection Agency NW, Liverpool (C. Elliot, W. Sopwith, M. Regan); Sanofi Pasteur MSD, Maidenhead, UK (N. Kitchin); Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan (O. Nakagomi, T. Nakagomi)

Main Article

Figure 3

Distribution of case-patients with A) community-acquired versus B) healthcare-associated acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in whom a virus was detected, by ward category and virus detected, Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool, UK, 2006–2007. Rates were calculated as numbers of cases per 1,000 admissions to each ward throughout the study and are shown for each virus tested, with a comparison of all cases where at least 1 virus was detected (diamonds).

Figure 3. Distribution of case-patients with A) community-acquired versus B) healthcare-associated acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in whom a virus was detected, by ward category and virus detected, Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool, UK, 2006–2007. Rates were calculated as numbers of cases per 1,000 admissions to each ward throughout the study and are shown for each virus tested, with a comparison of all cases where at least 1 virus was detected (diamonds).

Main Article

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