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Volume 16, Number 11—November 2010

Dispatch

Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Infantis, Israel

Ohad Gal-MorComments to Author , Lea Valinsky, Miriam Weinberger, Sara Guy, Joseph Jaffe, Yosef Ilan Schorr, Abraham Raisfeld, Vered Agmon, and Israel Nissan
Author affiliations: Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel (O. Gal-Mor); Ministry of Health Laboratories, Jerusalem, Israel (L. Valinsky, S. Guy, J. Jaffe, Y.I. Schorr, A. Raisfeld, V. Agmon, I. Nissan); Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin, Israel (M. Weinberger)

Main Article

Figure 2

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis isolates from clinical, food, and poultry sources isolated in Israel, 1970–2009, showing a high degree of clonality. Isolate number, year of isolation, and source are indicated. Bracket indicates I1 pulsotype pattern. Macrodigestion performed using XbaI restriction enzyme and genetic similarity (in %) was based on dice coefficients. PFGE was conducted according to the standardized Salmonella protocol Centers

Figure 2. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis isolates from clinical, food, and poultry sources isolated in Israel, 1970–2009, showing a high degree of clonality. Isolate number, year of isolation, and source are indicated. Bracket indicates I1 pulsotype pattern. Macrodigestion performed using XbaI restriction enzyme and genetic similarity (in %) was based on dice coefficients. PFGE was conducted according to the standardized Salmonella protocol Centers for Disease Prevention and Control PulseNet as described (4) by using S. enterica ser. Braenderup H9812 strain as a molecular size standard. Because of space limitations, only 34/58 pulsotype I1 clones are shown. A complete list is provided in the Appendix Table.

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