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Volume 16, Number 11—November 2010

Research

Salmonella enterica Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Clusters, Minnesota, USA, 2001–2007

Joshua M. RoundsComments to Author , Craig W. Hedberg, Stephanie Meyer, David J. Boxrud, and Kirk E. Smith
Author affiliations: Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA (J.M. Rounds, S. Meyer, D.J. Boxrud, K.E. Smith); University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (C.W. Hedberg)

Main Article

Table 1

Salmonella enterica serovar diversity identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis among case isolates submitted to the Minnesota Department of Health, 2001–2007*

Serovar No. isolates No. PFGE subtypes observed Serovar isolates represented by most common subtype, % Serovar isolates represented by 2 most common subtypes, % Serovar isolates represented by 3 most common subtypes, % Simpson index†
Heidelberg 223 46 57 62 66 0.67
Hadar 48 20 48 54 58 0.77
Enteritidis 822 80 38 60 73 0.79
Thompson 57 23 42 53 58 0.81
I 4,5,12:I:– 78 25 31 50 60 0.86
Braenderup 53 30 26 36 43 0.92
Oranienburg 63 26 21 32 41 0.93
Anatum 46 22 17 33 46 0.93
Paratyphi B var. L 60 35 22 37 43 0.93
Montevideo 121 59 22 30 36 0.94
Muenchen 73 50 21 25 27 0.96
Saintpaul 81 44 17 26 32 0.96
Typhimurium 1,004 285 11 20 28 0.96
Infantis 75 43 9 17 24 0.97
Agona 74 48 10 16 22 0.98
Newport 314 143 10 15 19 0.98
Javiana 48 41 6 11 15 0.99

*PFGE, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.
†Calculated as 1 – D = (Σn(n – 1))/(N(N – 1)), where n is number of isolates of each subtype and N is total number of isolates of a serovar. A value of 1 indicates infinite diversity, and a value of 0 indicates no diversity.

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