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Volume 16, Number 11—November 2010

Research

Measles Virus Strain Diversity, Nigeria and Democratic Republic of the Congo

Jacques R. Kremer, Edith Nkwembe, Akeeb O. Bola Oyefolu, Sheilagh B. Smit, Elisabeth Pukuta, Sunday A. Omilabu, Festus D. Adu, Jean-Jacques Muyembe Tamfum, and Claude P. MullerComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Centre de Recherche Publique–Santé/Laboratoire National de Santé, Luxembourg, Luxembourg (J.R. Kremer, C.P. Muller); Institut National de Recherche Biomédicale, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (E. Nkwembe, E. Pukuta, J.-J.M. Tamfum); Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria (A.O.B. Oyefolu); National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa (S.B. Smit); University of Lagos, Lagos (S.A. Omilabu); University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria (F.D. Adu)

Main Article

Figure 2

Epidemic curve of measles epidemic in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2005. Numbers of reported measles cases per week are shown by epidemiologic week, and measles incidence per week in the 35 health districts of Kinshasa is illustrated by gray shading. The periods during which the main genotype B2 variants (B2KIN-A, -B, and -C) were identified in Kinshasa are indicated above the epidemic curve.

Figure 2. Epidemic curve of measles epidemic in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2005. Numbers of reported measles cases per week are shown by epidemiologic week, and measles incidence per week in the 35 health districts of Kinshasa is illustrated by gray shading. The periods during which the main genotype B2 variants (B2KIN-A, -B, and -C) were identified in Kinshasa are indicated above the epidemic curve.

Main Article

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