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Volume 16, Number 12—December 2010

Perspective

Surveillance of Wild Birds for Avian Influenza Virus

Bethany J. HoyeComments to Author , Vincent J. Munster, Hiroshi Nishiura, Marcel Klaassen, and Ron A.M. Fouchier
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Netherlands Institute for Ecology, Nieuwersluis, the Netherlands (B.J. Hoye, M. Klaassen); Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (V.J. Munster, R.A.M. Fouchier); National Institute of Health, Hamilton, Montana, USA (V.J. Munster); University of Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands (H. Nishiura); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan (H. Nishiura); Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, Australia (M. Klaassen)

Main Article

Figure 3

Probability of detecting >1 individual bird infected with avian influenza virus from a given number of samples selected at random from an extremely large population in which individual birds are infected at random at different prevalence levels. Although this nominal minimum detectable prevalence assumes binomial sampling, it can also be used for gaining a rough quantitative estimate of the minimum number of samples required before embarking on a surveillance program.

Figure 3. Probability of detecting >1 individual bird infected with avian influenza virus from a given number of samples selected at random from an extremely large population in which individual birds are infected at random at different prevalence levels. Although this nominal minimum detectable prevalence assumes binomial sampling, it can also be used for gaining a rough quantitative estimate of the minimum number of samples required before embarking on a surveillance program.

Main Article

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