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Volume 16, Number 2—February 2010

Letter

Marburg Virus in Fruit Bat, Kenya

Ivan V. KuzminComments to Author , Michael Niezgoda, Richard Franka, Bernard Agwanda, Wanda Markotter, Robert F. Breiman, Wun-Ju Shieh, Sherif R. Zaki, and Charles E. Rupprecht
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (I.V. Kuzmin, M. Niezgoda, R. Franka, W.-J. Shieh, S.R. Zaki, C.E. Rupprecht); National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya (B. Agwanda); University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa (W. Markotter); and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–Kenya, Nairobi (R.F. Breiman)

Main Article

Appendix Figure

Phylogenetic position of Lake Victoria Marburgvirus isolate KE261 (in boldface) among other Marburg viruses, based on the 400-nt fragment of the nucleoprotein gene. GenBank accession numbers, sequence names, and origins (in parentheses) are indicated. Bootstrap support was calculated for 1,000 replicates. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. DRC, Democratic Republic of Congo.

Appendix Figure. Phylogenetic position of Lake Victoria Marburgvirus isolate KE261 (in boldface) among other Marburg viruses, based on the 400-nt fragment of the nucleoprotein gene. GenBank accession numbers, sequence names, and origins (in parentheses) are indicated. Bootstrap support was calculated for 1,000 replicates. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. DRC, Democratic Republic of Congo.

Main Article

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