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Volume 16, Number 3—March 2010

Dispatch

Rare Influenza A (H3N2) Variants with Reduced Sensitivity to Antiviral Drugs

Clyde Dapat1Comments to Author , Yasushi Suzuki1, Reiko Saito, Yadanar Kyaw, Yi Yi Myint, Nay Lin, Htun Naing Oo, Khin Yi Oo, Ne Win, Makoto Naito, Go Hasegawa, Isolde C. Dapat, Hassan Zaraket, Tatiana Baranovich, Makoto Nishikawa, Takehiko Saito, and Hiroshi Suzuki
Author affiliations: Niigata University, Niigata, Japan (C. Dapat, Y. Suzuki, R. Saito, M. Naito, G. Hasegawa, I.C. Dapat, H. Zaraket, T. Baranovich, H. Suzuki); National Institute of Animal Health, Tsukuba City, Japan (T. Saito); Niigata Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences, Niigata (M. Nishikawa); Sanpya Hospital, Yangon, Myanmar (Y. Kyaw); National Health Laboratory, Yangon (K.Y. Oo, N. Win); Central Myanmar Department of Medical Research, Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar (Y.Y. Myint, N. Lin, H.N. Oo)

Main Article

Figure 2

Detection of Q136K substitution in NA by sequencing in primary samples and virus isolates. Arrows indicate the first peak of the codon encoding amino acid position 136. Comparison of the sequence chromatogram showed a mixed population of bases in both original clinical samples and virus isolates, with a dominant peak for 136K (AAG) mutants, compared with wild-type 136Q (CAG) viruses. NA, neuraminidase.

Figure 2. Detection of Q136K substitution in NA by sequencing in primary samples and virus isolates. Arrows indicate the first peak of the codon encoding amino acid position 136. Comparison of the sequence chromatogram showed a mixed population of bases in both original clinical samples and virus isolates, with a dominant peak for 136K (AAG) mutants, compared with wild-type 136Q (CAG) viruses. NA, neuraminidase.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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