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Volume 16, Number 5—May 2010

Dispatch

Bluetongue Virus in Wild Deer, Belgium, 2005–2008

Annick LindenComments to Author , Fabien Grégoire, Adrien Nahayo, David Hanrez, Bénédicte Mousset, Audrey Laurent Massart, Ilse De Leeuw, Elise Vandemeulebroucke, Frank Vandenbussche, and Kris De Clercq
Author affiliations: University of Liège, Liège, Belgium (A. Linden, F. Grégoire, A. Nahayo, D. Hanrez, B. Mousset, L. Massart); Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre, Ukkel, Belgium (I. De Leeuw, E. Vandemeulebroucke, F. Vandenbussche, K. De Clercq)

Main Article

Figure 1

Frequency distribution of results of a competitive ELISA for detecting antibodies against bluetongue virus in serum samples from roe deer (white columns) and red deer (black columns) during the hunting seasons of A) 2005, B) 2006, C) 2007, and D) 2008, Belgium. Hunting was conducted in 30 (area 12,851 km2) of 37 (area 16,844 km2) forest districts known to contain wild cervids. The study population of wild cervids in southern Belgium (49°30′N–50°48′N) is estimated to be ≈11,000 red deer (Cervus e

Figure 1. Frequency distribution of results of a competitive ELISA for detecting antibodies against bluetongue virus in serum samples from roe deer (white columns) and red deer (black columns) during the hunting seasons of A) 2005, B) 2006, C) 2007, and D) 2008, Belgium. Hunting was conducted in 30 (area 12,851 km2) of 37 (area 16,844 km2) forest districts known to contain wild cervids. The study population of wild cervids in southern Belgium (49°30′N–50°48′N) is estimated to be ≈11,000 red deer (Cervus elaphus) and ≈33,000 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). Serum samples with a percentage negativity value (relative to the negative control serum) <66 were considered positive.

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