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Volume 16, Number 5—May 2010

Research

Spread of Adenovirus to Geographically Dispersed Military Installations, May–October 2007

Jill S. Trei1, Natalie M. JohnsComments to Author , Jason L. Garner, Lawrence B. Noel, Brian V. Ortman, Kari L. Ensz, Matthew C. Johns, Michel L. Bunning, and Joel C. Gaydos
Author affiliations: United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, USA (J.S. Trei, N.M. Johns, J.L. Garner, M.C. Johns); Air Education and Training Command, San Antonio (L.B. Noel, B.V. Ortman); Sheppard Air Force Base, Wichita Falls, Texas, USA (K.L. Ensz); Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio (M.L. Bunning); Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA (J.C. Gaydos)

Main Article

Figure 2

Locations of military sites that received US Air Force basic military training graduates for secondary training in North America (A), the Pacific region (B), and Europe and the Middle East (C). Red indicates locations that submitted specimens as part of adenovirus surveillance. Star in panel A indicates Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, USA. Maps generated by using TerraMetrics (www.terrametrics.com).

Figure 2. Locations of military sites that received US Air Force basic military training graduates for secondary training in North America (A), the Pacific region (B), and Europe and the Middle East (C). Red indicates locations that submitted specimens as part of adenovirus surveillance. Star in panel A indicates Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, USA. Maps generated by using TerraMetrics (www.terrametrics.com).

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Allina Hospitals & Clinics, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

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