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Volume 16, Number 5—May 2010

Dispatch

Vitamin D Deficiency and Tuberculosis Progression

Najeeha Talat, Sharon Perry, Julie Parsonnet, Ghaffar Dawood, and Rabia HussainComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan (N. Talat, R. Hussain); Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA (S. Perry, J. Parsonnet); Masoomeen General Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan (G. Dawood)

Main Article

Figure 1

Levels of vitamin D in plasma in the Karachi, Pakistan, tuberculosis (TB) household cohort (7) by TB status at baseline (disease-free, index TB case-patient, coprevalent TB case-patient, and past TB case-patient, treated 2–10 years previously). One disease-free contact was excluded because of an indeterminate test result. Box plots show the median, 25th, and 75th quartiles of serum vitamin D estimated for each group (A) by any TB diagnosis (current or past) at baseline (B) and by sex (C). Refere

Figure 1. Levels of vitamin D in plasma in the Karachi, Pakistan, tuberculosis (TB) household cohort (7) by TB status at baseline (disease-free, index TB case-patient, coprevalent TB case-patient, and past TB case-patient, treated 2–10 years previously). One disease-free contact was excluded because of an indeterminate test result. Box plots show the median, 25th, and 75th quartiles of serum vitamin D estimated for each group (A) by any TB diagnosis (current or past) at baseline (B) and by sex (C). Reference lines represent cut-offs for insufficient and sufficient vitamin D levels, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of medians.

Main Article

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