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Volume 16, Number 5—May 2010

Dispatch

La Crosse Virus in Aedes albopictus Mosquitoes, Texas, USA, 2009

Amy J. LambertComments to Author , Carol D. Blair, Mary D’Anton, Winnann Ewing, Michelle Harborth, Robyn Seiferth, Jeannie Xiang, and Robert S. Lanciotti
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (A.J. Lambert, R.S. Lanciotti); Colorado State University, Fort Collins (C.D. Blair); Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas, USA (M. D’Anton, W. Ewing, M. Harborth, R. Seiferth, J. Xiang)

Main Article

Figure 1

Geographic distribution of La Crosse virus (LACV) in accordance with the habitat range of Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes in the United States as inferred from the California serogroup virus neuroinvasive disease average annual incidence by county, 1996–2008. Incidence rates are shown in shades of blue. Dallas County and Fort Bend County locations of the 2009 LACV isolations from pools containing Ae.albopictus and Ae. triseriatus mosquitoes are indicated by green and red stars, respectively. Data a

Figure 1. Geographic distribution of La Crosse virus (LACV) in accordance with the habitat range of Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes in the United States as inferred from the California serogroup virus neuroinvasive disease average annual incidence by county, 1996–2008. Incidence rates are shown in shades of blue. Dallas County and Fort Bend County locations of the 2009 LACV isolations from pools containing Ae.albopictus and Ae. triseriatus mosquitoes are indicated by green and red stars, respectively. Data and figure adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website (www.cdc.gov/lac/tech/epi.html).

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