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Volume 16, Number 9—September 2010

Research

Cercarial Dermatitis Transmitted by Exotic Marine Snail

Sara V. BrantComments to Author , Andrew N. Cohen, David James, Lucia Hui, Albert Hom, and Eric S. Loker
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA (S.V. Brant, E.S. Loker); Center for Research on Aquatic Bioinvasions, Richmond, California, USA (A.N. Cohen); Alameda County Vector Control Services District, Alameda, California, USA (D. James, L. Hui, A. Hom)

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Table 1

Hosts examined for avian schistosomes at 2 locations, United States*

Animal, location, and date Species No. screened No. positive No. dissected No. positive
Snails
San Francisco Bay, California
2005 Jun Ilynassa obsoleta 96 0 48 0
2005 Jul Haminoea japonica 672 0 300 8
I. obsoleta 270 0 50 0
Urosalpinx cinerea 220 0 0 0
Littorina sp. 275 0 50 0
2006 May H. japonica 400 0 100 0
2006 Jun H. japonica 300 0 150 0
2006 Nov H. japonica 222 0 100 0
2007 Jun H. japonica 930 0 350 11
2007 Jul H. japonica 655 0 266 37
Philine sp. 38 0
2008 Aug H. japonica 1,100 50 180 70
I. obsoleta 400 0 100 0
Littorina sp. 200 0 100 0
Philine sp. 100 0
San Juan Island, Washington
2005 Aug
H. virescens
717
0
215
0
Birds
San Francisco Bay, California
2007 Aug Larus californicus NA NA 4 2
L. occidentalis NA NA 10 4
L. delawarensis NA NA 1 1
2008 Jan L. occidentalis NA NA 5 3
L. glaucescens NA NA 1 0
2008 Mar L. occidentalis NA NA 7 5
L. glaucescens NA NA 1 1

*NA, not applicable.

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