Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 16, Number 9—September 2010

CME ACTIVITY - Research

Illicit Drug Use and Risk for USA300 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections with Bacteremia

Kristen M. KreiselComments to Author , J. Kristie Johnson, O. Colin Stine, Michelle D. Shardell, Eli N. Perencevich, Alan J. Lesse, Fred M. Gordin, Michael W. Climo, and Mary-Claire Roghmann
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA (K.M. Kreisel, J.K. Johnson, O.C. Stine, M.D. Shardell, E.N. Perencevich, M.-C. Roghmann); VA Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore (K.M. Kreisel, E.N. Perencevich, M.-C. Roghmann); VA Western New York Healthcare System, Buffalo, New York, USA (A.J. Lesse); University at Buffalo, Buffalo (A.J. Lesse); Washington DC VA Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA (F.M. Gordin); George Washington University, Washington (F.M. Gordin); Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center, Richmond, VA, USA (M.W. Climo); Medical College of Virginia at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (M.W. Climo)

Main Article

Figure

Association between illicit drug use and USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among 300 veterans at 4 Veterans Affairs medical centers, USA, 2004–2008 (generalized linear model p value for trend over time = 0.23). †No illicit drug users had a bacteremic infection caused by USA300 MRSA in 2006.

Figure. Association between illicit drug use and USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among 300 veterans at 4 Veterans Affairs medical centers, USA, 2004–2008 (generalized linear model p value for trend over time = 0.23). †No illicit drug users had a bacteremic infection caused by USA300 MRSA in 2006.

Main Article

TOP