Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 16, Number 9—September 2010

Research

Comparison of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Seasonal Influenza, Western Australia, 2009

Dale Carcione, Carolien Giele, Gary K. Dowse, Donna B. Mak, Leigh Goggin, Kelly Kwan, Simon Williams, David Smith, and Paul EfflerComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Communicable Disease Control Directorate, Perth, Western Australia, Australia (D. Carcione, C. Giele, G.K. Dowse, D.B. Mak, L. Goggin, K. Kwan, P. Effler); PathWest Laboratory Medicine, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia (S. Williams, D. Smith)

Main Article

Figure 1

Number of notifications for pandemic and seasonal influenza, by date of onset and type, Western Australia, May 22–September 11, 2009. Influenza subtypes reported during the study period (n = 3,178): pandemic (H1N1) 2009, 2,794 (87.9%); influenza A (H3N2), 253 (8.0%); seasonal influenza A (H1N1), 89 (2.8%); influenza B, 36 (1.1%); and seasonal influenza A (not subtyped), 6 (0.2%).

Figure 1. Number of notifications for pandemic and seasonal influenza, by date of onset and type, Western Australia, May 22–September 11, 2009. Influenza subtypes reported during the study period (n = 3,178): pandemic (H1N1) 2009, 2,794 (87.9%); influenza A (H3N2), 253 (8.0%); seasonal influenza A (H1N1), 89 (2.8%); influenza B, 36 (1.1%); and seasonal influenza A (not subtyped), 6 (0.2%).

Main Article

TOP