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Volume 16, Number 9—September 2010

Letter

Acute Cervical Lymphadenitis Caused by Mycobacterium florentinum

Salma S. SyedComments to Author , Omolara Aderinboye, Kimberly E. Hanson, and Eric D. Spitzer
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York, USA (S.S. Syed, O. Aderinboye, E.D. Spitzer); University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA (K.E. Hanson); Associated Regional and University Pathologists Laboratories, Salt Lake City (K.E. Hanson)

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Figure

Computed tomography scan of the neck of a 3-year-old girl, showing right lateral retropharyngeal abscess (white arrows) and enlarged bilateral posterior cervical lymph nodes with low attenuation of a right cervical lymph node (black arrow), consistent with atypical mycobacterium adenitis.

Figure. Computed tomography scan of the neck of a 3-year-old girl, showing right lateral retropharyngeal abscess (white arrows) and enlarged bilateral posterior cervical lymph nodes with low attenuation of a right cervical lymph node (black arrow), consistent with atypical mycobacterium adenitis.

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