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Volume 16, Number 9—September 2010

Letter

Mobile Messaging as Surveillance Tool during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Mexico

Martín LajousComments to Author , Leon Danon, Ruy López-Ridaura, Christina M. Astley, Joel C. Miller, Scott F. Dowell, Justin J. O’Hagan, Edward Goldstein, and Marc Lipsitch
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Center for Population Health Research National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico (M. Lajous, R. López-Ridaura); Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (M. Lajous, L. Danon, C.M. Astley, J.C. Miller, J.J. O’Hagan, E. Goldstein, M. Lipsitch); University of Warwick, Coventry, UK (L. Danon); National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA (J.C. Miller); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (S.F. Dowell)

Main Article

Figure

Proportion of severe cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Mexico, April 2009, from unstructured supplementary service data survey and confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiológica. Suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 are ILI cases for which no laboratory confirmation was possible. The daily proportion of reported severe cases and daily counts of confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were smoothed by using a 5-day

Figure. Proportion of severe cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Mexico, April 2009, from unstructured supplementary service data survey and confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiológica. Suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 are ILI cases for which no laboratory confirmation was possible. The daily proportion of reported severe cases and daily counts of confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were smoothed by using a 5-day moving average.

Main Article

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