Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 17, Number 1—January 2011

Dispatch

Possible Interruption of Measles Virus Transmission, Uganda, 2006–2009

Frederick N. BaliraineComments to Author , Josephine Bwogi, Henry Bukenya, Ronald Seguya, Theopista Kabaliisa, Annet Kisakye, William B. Mbabazi, and Sheilagh B. Smit
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: University of California, San Francisco, California, USA (F.N. Baliraine); Uganda Virus Research Institute, Entebbe, Uganda (J. Bwogi, H. Bukenya, R. Seguya, T. Kabaliisa); Uganda National Expanded Program for Immunization, Entebbe (A. Kisakye); World Health Organization, Kampala, Uganda (A. Kisakye); Management Sciences for Health/Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems, Juba, Sudan (W.B. Mbabazi); National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa (S.B. Smit)

Main Article

Figure 1

Laboratory-confirmed measles cases in Uganda, 2006‒2009. Data from the accelerated measles control period 2003‒2005 are included for comparison. The surge in measles cases during 2006 was caused by a resumption of measles outbreaks after a 3-year lag period, due to an accumulated number of susceptible persons (1).

Figure 1. Laboratory-confirmed measles cases in Uganda, 2006‒2009. Data from the accelerated measles control period 2003‒2005 are included for comparison. The surge in measles cases during 2006 was caused by a resumption of measles outbreaks after a 3-year lag period, due to an accumulated number of susceptible persons (1).

Main Article

TOP