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Volume 17, Number 1—January 2011

Dispatch

Identification of Rickettsial Infections by Using Cutaneous Swab Specimens and PCR

Yassina Bechah, Cristina Socolovschi, and Didier RaoultComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliation: Université de la Méditerranée, Marseille, France

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Figure 1

Molecular detection of Rickettsia spp. in swabs of skin lesions, Marseille, France. Guinea pigs were infected intradermally with different Rickettsia spp., and skin eschar swab specimens were obtained when lesions appeared. Samples (2 ± 1 mg) were tested, and DNA was extracted in a final volume of 100 μL. Number of rickettsial DNA copies was determined by quantitative PCR until day 20 postinfection for R. akari (black line), R. conorii (red line), and R. rhipicephali (blue line) (A) and until da

Figure 1. Molecular detection of Rickettsia spp. in swabs of skin lesions, Marseille, France. Guinea pigs were infected intradermally with different Rickettsia spp., and skin eschar swab specimens were obtained when lesions appeared. Samples (2 ± 1 mg) were tested, and DNA was extracted in a final volume of 100 μL. Number of rickettsial DNA copies was determined by quantitative PCR until day 20 postinfection for R. akari (black line), R. conorii (red line), and R. rhipicephali (blue line) (A) and until day 13 postinfection for R. africae (black line), Orientia tsutsugamushi (red line), and R. parkeri (blue line) (B). Values are copies of citrate synthase A gene/5 μL swab extract.

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