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Volume 17, Number 1—January 2011

Dispatch

Echinostoma revolutum Infection in Children, Pursat Province, Cambodia

Woon-Mok Sohn, Jong-Yil ChaiComments to Author , Tai-Soon Yong, Keeseon S. Eom, Cheong-Ha Yoon, Muth Sinuon, Duong Socheat, and Soon-Hyung Lee
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju, South Korea (W.-M. Sohn); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea (J.-Y. Chai, S.-H. Lee); Korea Association of Health Promotion, Seoul (J.-Y. Chai, C.-H. Yoon); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (T.-S. Yong); Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, South Korea (K.S. Eom); Center for National Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia (M. Sinuon, D. Socheat)

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Figure 2

Echinostoma revolutum specimens recovered from schoolchildren in Pursat Province, Cambodia, which had 2 testes in the postequatorial region. A) An adult worm (8 mm long) showing lobulated testes. B) Another adult worm showing globular testes. C) Head collar of an adult specimen armed with 37 collar spines arranged in a single row, including 5 end-group spines on each side.

Figure 2Echinostoma revolutum specimens recovered from schoolchildren in Pursat Province, Cambodia, which had 2 testes in the postequatorial region. A) An adult worm (8 mm long) showing lobulated testes. B) Another adult worm showing globular testes. C) Head collar of an adult specimen armed with 37 collar spines arranged in a single row, including 5 end-group spines on each side.

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