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Volume 17, Number 10—October 2011

Dispatch

Isolation and Phylogenetic Grouping of Equine Encephalosis Virus in Israel

Karin Aharonson-Raz, Amir Steinman, Velizar Bumbarov, Sushila Maan, Narender Singh Maan, Kyriaki Nomikou, Carrie Batten, Christiaan Potgieter, Yuval Gottlieb, Peter Mertens, and Eyal KlementComments to Author 
Author affiliations: The Hebrew University, Rehovot, Israel (K. Aharonson-Raz, A. Steinman, Y. Gottlieb, E. Klement); Kimron Veterinary Institute, Bet Dagan, Israel (V. Bumbarov); Institute for Animal Health, Pirbright, UK (S. Maan, N.S. Maan, K. Nomikou, C. Batten, P. Mertens); Deltamune (Pty) Ltd, Lyttelton, South Africa (C. Potgieter)

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Figure 1

Geographic location of farms in Israel with horses showing signs of equine encephalosis virus (EEV) infection. Eight horses with suspected EEV infection lived on 7 farms. Red circles indicate farms with EEV-positive cases.

Figure 1. Geographic location of farms in Israel with horses showing signs of equine encephalosis virus (EEV) infection. Eight horses with suspected EEV infection lived on 7 farms. Red circles indicate farms with EEV-positive cases.

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