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Volume 17, Number 11—November 2011

Letter

Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection and Showerheads, Taiwan

Yu-Min Kuo, Aristine Cheng, Po-Chang Wu, Song-Chou Hsieh, Szu-Min Hsieh, Po-Ren HsuehComments to Author , and Chia-Li Yu
Author affiliations: National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

Main Article

Figure

Random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns of 8 isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus generated by arbitrarily primed PCR with the primers OPA2, OPA18, and M13 (Operon Technologies, Inc., Alameda, CA, USA). Lanes: M, molecular size marker (1-kb ladder; Gibco BRL, Gaithersburg,MD, USA); 1, isolate A; 2, isolate B; 3, isolate C; 4, isolate D; 5, isolate F; 6–8, three unrelated isolates of M. abscessus recovered from cutaneous lesions of 3 patients who were treated at National Taiwan University hospit

Figure. Random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns of 8 isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus generated by arbitrarily primed PCR with the primers OPA2, OPA18, and M13 (Operon Technologies, Inc., Alameda, CA, USA). Lanes: M, molecular size marker (1-kb ladder; Gibco BRL, Gaithersburg,MD, USA); 1, isolate A; 2, isolate B; 3, isolate C; 4, isolate D; 5, isolate F; 6–8, three unrelated isolates of M. abscessus recovered from cutaneous lesions of 3 patients who were treated at National Taiwan University hospital in 2010 (see text for designation of isolates).

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